The Soultana´s Court

It is so called because the legendary romantic scenes in the novels written by Genés Pérez de Hita are believed to have been set here.

For your interest

  • The Lower Gardens

    The Lower Gardens connect with the Generalife Theatre (Teatro del Generalife).

  • The Palace of the Generalife

    The door has a fairly rich display of craftwork. The entrance to the palace is preceded by the sight of the markings of the traditional symbols of the hand and the key in the arch.

  • The Court of the Main Canal

    Also known as the Court of the Estuary, it is a long and narrow court.

  • The Water Stairway

    It is a small stairway that is protected by vaulting laurel trees, designed in a way that would suit the needs of a medieval sultan.

  • The Romantic Observation Point

    The low-lying windows are a characteristic of Nasrid architecture.

  • The High Gardens

    The Generalife High Gardens resemble more the traditional Andalusian house and walled garden in Granada at the time than they do a Muslim farmstead.

  • The Promenade of the Oleanders

    The Promenade of the Oleanders is connected to the Promenade of the Cypress Trees.

  • Water Ponds

    The construction of the Alhambra was linked to the need to develop an effective hydraulic system.

  • The Promenade of the Cypress Trees

    Following the Promenade of the Oleander, the Promenade of the Cypress Trees takes the visitor to the place of exit.

  • The Generalife Theatre

    The Festival of Music and Dance of Granada in 1952 provided an impetus to the building of a theatre in the historical-artistic monuments complex.

Gallery Location

Crossing the side bedroom of the Royal Chamber (Sala Regia) you ascend to an open corridor called the Court of the Sultana’s Cypress Tree (Patio del Ciprés de la Sultana).

The arcaded structure dates back to 1584. In front of it is an intimate court and a garden with a baroque flare to it. The area was originally the site of the now disappeared Palace Bath. Water from the irrigation canal, which at one time probably filled it while flowing to the adjacent courtyard, can still be seen pouring through a gap in the side wall.

In the centre is a U-shaped pool of water, in the middle of which in the 19th century there used to be a smaller pool, with a stone fountain.

Water jets can be found all over historical-artistic monuments site, shooting water into the air and refreshing the environment the way the Ambassador of the Venetian Republic, Venecia Andrea Navaggiero, reported seeing in 1526 when he visited the Generalife.

A tiny door on the south side of the site leads back to the Court of the Main Canal (Patio de la Acequia), and the rest of the Historic-Artistic Monuments Complex.

If you have time, and are willing to climb some more stairs, a visit to the upper part of the Generalife site is worth a visit. It can be reached by going through the door at the centre of the court, in front of the gallery.